As I reflect on the next three to five years, the strong operational and safety performance we have achieved through the implementation of Human and Organizational Performance (HOP) and Safety 2 fills me with optimism. However, a question lingers in my mind: What happens if we remove the champion of HOP? Will its impact continue to multiply, or will it fade away? In this blog post, I will discuss our plans for the next few years and share my insights on how we can embed HOP as a philosophy and value throughout our organization, ensuring its sustained success and long-term benefits.

Embedding HOP: A Philosophy, Not Just a Program 

HOP is not a mere program with a fixed end goal; it is an ever-changing philosophy that influences the entire organization. To ensure its continuous effectiveness, we must adapt and evolve our approach constantly. HOP extends beyond safety and process reliability; it permeates every aspect of our organization, from HR to leadership. Hence, our work in progress lies in expanding the application of HOP principles beyond safety and reliability and integrating them into all areas of our operations.

Leadership’s Crucial Role in HOP¬†

Contrary to popular belief, HOP is not solely focused on frontline workers. Instead, its primary target is the leadership team, including supervisors and superintendents. By creating an environment of trust, we empower our workers to voice their concerns and ideas without hesitation. The ultimate goal is to foster a culture where employees feel comfortable pointing out areas for improvement and expressing their thoughts on what can be done differently. Through this process, we aim to prevent harm to our employees, the environment, and our equipment by implementing proactive measures upstream.

Sustaining HOP: Ensuring Continuity and Multiplication 

One of my greatest fears is that without my direct involvement, HOP might lose its momentum. Therefore, our focus for the next couple of years will be on establishing a self-sustaining system that perpetuates the HOP philosophy even in the absence of specific individuals. We need to create mechanisms that ensure HOP becomes deeply embedded in our business processes, so it continues to thrive and multiply. By developing structures and practices that enable HOP to evolve and adapt organically, we can secure its long-term success and create a resilient safety culture.

Conclusion

Looking ahead, our commitment to HOP remains unwavering. We recognize that it is not a program with a predefined endpoint, but rather a philosophy and value that transforms our organization. By extending HOP principles beyond safety, instilling trust, and empowering our workforce, we can pave the way for a future where HOP is an integral part of our entire organization. Through continuous improvement and a focus on leadership, we will build a sustainable safety culture that protects our employees, the environment, and our overall operational excellence.